Stowell's Evergreen Corn - (Zea mays)

$3.35

Stowell’s Evergreen Corn is semi-sweet, originating as a cross between Menomoni Flour Corn and the Iroquois Northern Sugar Corn brought back from the Sullivan expedition in 1779. This cross was created and first grown by Nathan Stowell of Burlington, New Jersey, a few years prior to 1848.

Introduced commercially in 1848, it became the leading white corn variety for home gardeners. One of the oldest named varieties still available, it can be pulled up whole in the fall before fully ripe, root and all, and hung upside down in a cool pantry or barn. Fresh corn could be picked well into February from these semi-wilted plants, thus prolonging the fresh corn season giving the name 'Evergreen'. This storage concept was borrowed from the Iroquois, who stored their sweet corn in this manner and in the era before canning, this corn filled an important niche in the rural American diet.

Now raised as a late-season sweet corn, the plants grow 7 1/2 to 8 feet tall and produce ears about 30 inches off the ground. The ears measure 7 to 8 inches long and about 2 1/4 inches in diameter, although somewhat tapering and rarely filled at the tip. There are 16 rows of white kernels on a white cob. When dry, the kernels are wrinkled and fall easily from the cob.

Planting Instructions

Plant corn directly in warm and rich soil 1 or 2 weeks after last frost in spring. Germination is best in soil temperature of at least 60F. At 55F, it will be retarded, and at 50F there is minimal germination. 

Plant 1-2" deep and thin to 8-10" apart in rows 30 - 36" apart. Planting 4-row blocks ensures better pollination than 2 long rows. Corn is ready when the silk on the ears is brown. Old timers say to get the barbeque hot as you go out to pick corn. The sooner it is cooked the tastier it is, and roasting it is heavenly!

 

Full Description

Stowell’s Evergreen Corn is semi-sweet, originating as a cross between Menomoni Flour Corn and the Iroquois Northern Sugar Corn brought back from the Sullivan expedition in 1779. This cross was created and first grown by Nathan Stowell of Burlington, New Jersey, a few years prior to 1848.

Introduced commercially in 1848, it became the leading white corn variety for home gardeners. One of the oldest named varieties still available, it can be pulled up whole in the fall before fully ripe, root and all, and hung upside down in a cool pantry or barn. Fresh corn could be picked well into February from these semi-wilted plants, thus prolonging the fresh corn season giving the name 'Evergreen'. This storage concept was borrowed from the Iroquois, who stored their sweet corn in this manner and in the era before canning, this corn filled an important niche in the rural American diet.

Now raised as a late-season sweet corn, the plants grow 7 1/2 to 8 feet tall and produce ears about 30 inches off the ground. The ears measure 7 to 8 inches long and about 2 1/4 inches in diameter, although somewhat tapering and rarely filled at the tip. There are 16 rows of white kernels on a white cob. When dry, the kernels are wrinkled and fall easily from the cob.

Planting Instructions

Plant corn directly in warm and rich soil 1 or 2 weeks after last frost in spring. Germination is best in soil temperature of at least 60F. At 55F, it will be retarded, and at 50F there is minimal germination. 

Plant 1-2" deep and thin to 8-10" apart in rows 30 - 36" apart. Planting 4-row blocks ensures better pollination than 2 long rows. Corn is ready when the silk on the ears is brown. Old timers say to get the barbeque hot as you go out to pick corn. The sooner it is cooked the tastier it is, and roasting it is heavenly!

 

Current Stock:
Seed Count Approx 125 seeds per pack Days to Maturity 80-100 days Type Sweet Organic Yes
SKU: V1035

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